snails

Snails; Friends Or Foe?

Insects and bugs are unavoidable in the garden but it’s best for a gardener to know which insects are particularly useful and which ones are not. Snails in the garden can serve as food for wildlife; birds, frogs, and hedgehogs, and their compost would add up as manure for the garden.

Quite apart from being part of the natural balance, snails only eat holes through plants, leaves, stems, roots, tubers, and bulb. A handful of snails can destroy your garden by eating on the crops. Even though they look slow and sluggish, the harm they do to your plants can be bad for your garden.

Snails can be considered weather indicators sometimes. When you discover a lot of snails in your garden, it simply means the rain is about to come as they like to be found in damp, cool conditions. Snails also eat garden debris and their waste is rich in nitrogen and minerals. Grass and plants that have the snail’s waste on them would have increased nutrition as this is the work of nitrogen and minerals on plants. This is normal with common snails.

Snails enjoy garden debris and rotting compost as this is what attracts them to your garden. As snails climb plants, trees, and shrubs, they cause harm to them because they feed off them. Snails don’t do a lot of damage on ground level but once they are able to climb (they are great climbers) they can feast on fruit just as it’s ripening. They can strip the bark of a tree. Snails can also go underground and chew the roots of a plant which restricts the growth. When the seedlings of a plant are destroyed by the snail, it damages the plant and this leads to production loss for the gardener.

snail on hand

Snails can be friends and foes, but they are of more disadvantage to the gardener than it is of advantage to them. However, I find snails very cute and quite fascinating! So they’re not all bad!

Author: HC

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